Soft Sleep – “Unravel”

“Unravel” is filled with a late 90’s “Goo Goo Dolls”-like romanticism, pairing acoustic guitar strums against soft approachable melodies. “Unravel” is slow, but doesn’t drag. The chorus accelerates the pacing, and the verses retract that energy.  Make sure you keep an eye out for the release of this Seattle Band’s self-titled EP in May 2015 on Rocket Heart Records.

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Life in Film – “Anna, Please Don’t Go”

Life in Film released its debut album, “Here It Comes” earlier this week, and I was immediately taken by the track, “Anna, Please Don’t Go.” A charming love song that would fit perfectly into any upcoming indie flick, be it by Wes Anderson (see “Moonrise Kingdom”) or by Marc Webb (“500 Days of Summer”). This London four-piece band has already attracted the right people, including playing with the Rolling Stones.

FUTURISTIC FRIDAY

In light of “Throwback Thursday or #tbt” which involves posting something that has nostalgic value, we at RunTheMill wanted to turn this popular convention on its head. This weekly posting will share a song that is either ahead of its time or attempts to push us out of our comfort sound zone.

Artist: Jose Gonzalez

Song: “Let it Carry You (Holy Ghost! Remix)”

Brooklyn’s funky crusaders Holy Ghost! has laid down an 80s-soaked remix of Jose Gonzalez’s recently released “Let it Carry You” off the 2015 Vesitiges & Claws album. The duo experiments with Jose’s bare folk melody, and smothers it with synths, turns the bass line electric, and adds classic computer track drum rolls. Enjoy the weekend and let this be your accompaniment to a long run.

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Oh Wonder – “Livewire”

Too often, pop artists will show glimpses of restraint, but are then forced to show the song’s metaphorical “full hand” in the first chorus to make it “radio-ready.” Oh Wonder holds back in “Livewire,” letting the listener get what they think is a full chorus the first time, and on the second time around, the group reveals its full sound and potential. This London duo is a step away from breakthrough, and it is only a matter of time until others begin copying Oh Wonder’s sound. My only frustratingly minute nitpick with the song is that the chorus sounds eerily similar to Katy Perry’s “Teenage Dream.” See if you can find the section that sounds exactly like: “Let you put your hands on me in my skin-tight jeans, Be your teenage dream tonight.”

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The National- “Sunshine on my Back”

Like My Morning Jacket, The National has solidified their sound, but that does not mean there isn’t more room for introspection. On the recent track, “Sunshine on my Back,” the chorus resembles the words Matt Berninger breathes: there are splashes of sunlight (major chords) and spots of shade (minor, lead in chords). It’s modest, selective, and a perfect remedy for your day. The song features vocals from Sharon Van Etten, and it was recorded during the sessions for Trouble Will Find Me back in 2011, but didn’t make the cut. RunTheMill is psyched to see these guys alongside Sufjan Stevens and Bon Iver at the first Eaux Claire Festival July 17th-18th, in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Coverage to follow.

My Morning Jacket- “Spring (Among the Living)”

Among the living again
Out in the light of day’s warm embrace again

The members of My Morning Jacket are veterans of songwriting, and it seems the band’s not quiet through trying to figure things out. On May 5th, 2015, MMJ will release its 7th album marking its 17th year as a band (some members have come and gone). That sense of time, change and adaptation shines through on their early released tracks. “Spring (Among the Living)” is an unrelenting, evolving jam. Eerie echoes begin the build, a deep bass enters, and then we hear an idea: a flat guitar melody, a snappy snare hit, and then the verse begins. The beat is straight, insistent that it’s here to stay. The listener craves a change, but the song doesn’t provide it to you. At the 1:34 mark, Jim James gives you a classic rock countdown, but instead of rising in volume, the beat disappears, and the song has to rebuild again from the ground floor. The song continues to dissatisfy us, as we never reach that pop resolution. MMJ is done hibernating, but conscious that this spring’s light of day will soon move on. Welcome festival season MMJ.